State of the Commons Report 2015

Creative commons. State of the Commons Report 2015.

Collaboration, sharing, and cooperation are a driving force for human evolution. Creative Commoners have known this fact all along, and recently there has been a flurry of new research to explain why. We are hardwired for sharing. Harvard professor on evolutionary dynamics Martin Nowak calls it the essential “snuggle for survival” – evidence that sharing is not just a selfless act. Sharing has concurrent and lasting benefits, multiplied for the giver, the receiver, and communities at large.

Lire la suite :

Future Libraries : Workshops Summary and Emerging Insights

Future Libraries : Workshops Summary and Emerging Insights. ARUP, 2015.

This report brings to light significant trends that will influence the future of public, academic and corporate libraries and outlines the implications on their design, operation and user experience. It is the result of a collective exploration through series of workshop events held in London, Melbourne, San Francisco and Sydney, attended by experts in the design and management of libraries. This piece of research presents a glimpse into the future. It explores what we may expect to see as the physical and the digital arena continues to evolve and aims to serve as a foundation for further discussion around the future role of libraries in the communities they serve.

Lire la suite :

The Library in the Life of the User: Engaging with People Where They Live and Learn

Connaway, Lynn Silipigni, comp. 2015. The Library in the Life of the User: Engaging with People Where They Live and Learn. Dublin, Ohio: OCLC Research.

As Lorcan Dempsey has stated, it is important to think of the library in the life of the user and not the user in the life of the library. The findings included in this report illustrate how some behaviors have changed as new technologies emerge while other behaviors remain constant. We have heard from our study participants time and time again that there are more convenient and familiar ways of getting information today than from the traditional library, usually discovered through a web browser, including freely available resources, such as Wikipedia; human resources; and library resources. We also have learned that the context of the information need influences how and why people engage with technology and make their information choices. Convenience often is the reason expressed for the choices that people make about technology, and about the information and resources they use. Convenient does not necessarily mean simple since individuals constantly are evaluating and assessing the importance and necessity of their information needs. This represents a fluid and ever-changing process, which makes it difficult to identify the one perfect way to provide information and services; making the saying, one size fits none, a reality.

This compilation will be of interest to librarians, information scientists and library and information science students and researchers as they think about new ways to provide user-centered library services and to conduct research that will inform practice in ways to engage and build relationships with users and potential users. We suggest that as they peruse it, they think of how we, as librarians, can provide services and systems that will complement the ways individuals, work, live and learn. Is this possible, or is it taking on more than we have the capacity to do, especially in the current environment of limited resources and budgets? And, ultimately, is this something that we have an interest in pursuing?

This work represents more than a decade of collaborative work with colleagues from The Ohio State University and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, with funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and with Jisc, in collaboration with Oxford University and the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. It is part of our user studies theme, in which we study the ways in which individuals engage with technology; how they seek, access, contribute, and use information; and how and why they demonstrate these behaviors and do what they do. The goal of this work is to provide the library community with behavioral evidence about individuals’ perceptions, habits and requirements to ensure that the design of future library services is all about the user.

Lire la suite :