Archives de catégorie : Communication scientifique

Challenges in Matching Dataset Citation Strings to Datasets in Social Science

Mathiak, Brigitte, Boland, Katarina. Challenges in Matching Dataset Citation Strings to Datasets in Social Science. D-Lib Magazine, January/February 2015, Volume 21, Number 1/2. DOI: http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january15/mathiak/01mathiak.html

Finding dataset citations in scientific publications to gain information on the usage of research data is an important step to increase visibility of data and to give datasets more weight in the scientific community. Unlike publication impact, which is readily measured by citation counts, dataset citation remains a great unknown. In recent work, we introduced an algorithm to find dataset citations in full text documents automatically, but, in fact, this is just half the road to travel. Once the citation string has been found, it has to be matched to the correct DOI. This is more complicated than it sounds. In social science, survey datasets are typically recorded in a much more fine-granular way than they are cited, differentiating between years, versions, samples, modes of the interview, countries, even questionnaire variants. At the same time, the actual citation strings typically ignore these details. This poses a number of challenges to the matching of citations strings to datasets. In this paper, we discuss these challenges in more detail and present our ideas on how to solve them using an ontology for research datasets.

Lire la suite : http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january15/mathiak/01mathiak.html

Digitization, Internet publishing and the revival of scholarly monographs: An empirical study in India

Digitization, Internet publishing and the revival of scholarly monographs: An empirical study in India
by Rojers P. Joseph and Shishir K. Jha. First Monday, Volume 20, Number 1 – 5 January 2015. http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/4932/4203. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/fm.v20i1.4932

This research shows the growing utility of internet-based digital models in reviving the crisis-stricken traditional print monograph publishing. The rising prices of scientific journals in the past three decades forced academic and research libraries to resort to cutbacks on monograph budgets. The declining sales to libraries and rising production costs led to a significant drop in global demand for print monographs, rendering monograph publishing financially unattractive. Combining the flexibility of digitized content with the global reach of the Internet, three emerging digital models — print on demand, bundled e-books, and e-consortia — are beginning to revamp the monograph publishing business.

Lire la suite : http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/fm.v20i1.4932

Scholarly communication within the Library

Taylor & Francis group. Scholarly communication within the Library, juin 2014. http://www.tandf.co.uk/libsite/whitePapers/scholarlyCommunication/

In October 2013, Taylor & Francis commissioned research to examine specifically how libraries can meet user needs and expectations.

The research explored the correlation between physical and virtual library spaces, and any impacts this might have for students and faculty using the library’s resources.

It also examined the extent to which marketing efforts were conducted in libraries and how publishers can help enhance the library/end-user experience.

Lire la suite : http://www.tandf.co.uk/libsite/whitePapers/scholarlyCommunication/

Putting open science into practice : A social dilemma?

Scheliga Kaja, Friesike Sascha, « Putting open science into practice: A social dilemma? », First Monday, 24 août 2014, vol. 19, no 9. http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/fm.v19i9.5381

Digital technologies carry the promise of transforming science and opening up the research process. We interviewed researchers from a variety of backgrounds about their attitudes towards and experiences with openness in their research practices. We observe a considerable discrepancy between the concept of open science and scholarly reality. While many researchers support open science in theory, the individual researcher is confronted with various difficulties when putting open science into practice. We analyse the major obstacles to open science and group them into two main categories: individual obstacles and systemic obstacles. We argue that the phenomenon of open science can be seen through the prism of a social dilemma: what is in the collective best interest of the scientific community is not necessarily in the best interest of the individual scientist. We discuss the possibilities of transferring theoretical solutions to social dilemma problems to the realm of open science.

Lire la suite : http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/fm.v19i9.5381

Open access / Peter Suber

Open access [Ressource électronique] / Peter Suber. – Cambridge, Mass. ; London : The MIT Press, cop. 2012.(MIT Press essential knowledge series). 

Ouvrage en libre-accès publié sur le site du MIT Press. http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/open-access

The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work “open access”: digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue.

In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn’t, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber’s influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers.

Lire la suite : http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/open-access

Economics of scholarly communication in transition

Article publié dans la revue First Monday. Morrison, Heather. 2013. « Economics of Scholarly Communication in Transition ». First Monday 18(6). Consulté juin 5, 2013. http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/4370/3685

Academic library budgets are the primary source of revenue for scholarly journal publishing. There is more than enough money in the budgets of academic libraries to fund a fully open access scholarly journal publishing system. Seeking efficiencies, such as a reasonable average cost per article, will be key to a successful transition. This paper presents macro–level economic data and analysis illustrating the key factors and potential for cost savings.

Lire la suite : http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/4370/3685

 

 

UK Survey of Academics 2012

Publié sur DocuTicker, le 21 mai 2013 : Ithaka S+R | Jisc | RLUK: UK Survey of Academics 2012, May 16, 2013. http://web.docuticker.com/go/docubase/70117
Scholarly communications is changing, and changing rapidly. Technological developments have expanded the potential range of dissemination of research and the delivery mechanisms, with researchers expecting any-time, anywhere access. Technology also allows for an expansion of the types of material that can be readily shared–not just articles and monographs, but datasets and software. Policy developments are increasingly focussing on issues surrounding openness, wider public engagement and impact. Funders worldwide are looking to maximise the investment they make in research and are expressing views on how research outputs are shared. The sociology of scholarly communication is also changing. While the importance of ‘formal’ communication through journal articles and monographs is undimmed, there is an increasing use of ‘informal’ channels with ever greater traffic through blogs, wikis, Twitter and even press releases.

Lire la suite : http://web.docuticker.com/go/docubase/70117