Archives par mot-clé : dépôts institutionnels

Institutional Repositories and Academic Social Networks: Competition or Complement? A Study of Open Access Policy Compliance vs. ResearchGate Participation

Lovett, J.A. et al., (2017). Institutional Repositories and Academic Social Networks: Competition or Complement? A Study of Open Access Policy Compliance vs. ResearchGate Participation. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 5(1). DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.2183

Abstract

INTRODUCTION The popularity of academic social networks like ResearchGate and Academia.edu indicates that scholars want to share their work, yet for universities with Open Access (OA) policies, these sites may be competing with institutional repositories (IRs) for content. This article seeks to reveal researcher practices, attitudes, and motivations around uploading their work to ResearchGate and complying with an institutional OA Policy through a study of faculty at the University of Rhode Island (URI). METHODS We conducted a population study to examine the participation by 558 full-time URI faculty members in the OA Policy and ResearchGate followed by a survey of 728 full-time URI faculty members about their participation in the two services. DISCUSSION The majority of URI faculty does not participate in the OA Policy or use ResearchGate. Authors’ primary motivations for participation are sharing their work more broadly and increasing its visibility and impact. Faculty who participate in ResearchGate are more likely to participate in the OA Policy, and vice versa. The fact that the OA Policy targets the author manuscript and not the final published article constitutes a significant barrier to participation. CONCLUSION Librarians should not view academic social networks as a threat to Open Access. Authors’ strong preference for sharing the final, published version of their articles provides support for calls to hasten the transition to a Gold OA publishing system. Misunderstandings about the OA Policy and copyright indicate a need for librarians to conduct greater education and outreach to authors about options for legally sharing articles.

Lire la suite : https://jlsc-pub.org/articles/10.7710/2162-3309.2183/galley/148/download/

Panorama des ressources disponibles en Open Access – 2014

Billet publié sur Blogus operandi le 21 octobre 2014 : http://blogusoperandi.blogspot.be/2014/10/panorama-des-ressources-disponible-en.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+BlogusOperandi+%28Blogus+operandi%29&utm_content=Netvibes

« Pour l’Open Access Week 2014, le thème est « Open Access for an open generation », une bonne opportunité pour présenter les avantages de l’Open Access à une nouvelle génération de chercheurs désireux de partager le plus efficacement possible les résultats de leurs recherche. »

Lire la suite : http://blogusoperandi.blogspot.be/2014/10/panorama-des-ressources-disponible-en.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+BlogusOperandi+%28Blogus+operandi%29&utm_content=Netvibes

The dark side of Open Access in Google and Google Scholar: the case of Latin-American repositories

Orduña-Malea Enrique et Lopez-Cozar Emilio Delgado, 2014, « The dark side of Open Access in Google and Google Scholar: the case of Latin-American repositories », 17 juin 2014, publié sur le site ArXiv.org. http://arxiv-web3.library.cornell.edu/abs/1406.4331

Since repositories are a key tool in making scholarly knowledge open access, determining their presence and impact on the Web is essential, particularly in Google (search engine par excellence) and Google Scholar (a tool increasingly used by researchers to search for academic information). The few studies conducted so far have been limited to very specific geographic areas (USA), which makes it necessary to find out what is happening in other regions that are not part of mainstream academia, and where repositories play a decisive role in the visibility of scholarly production. The main objective of this study is to ascertain the presence and visibility of Latin American repositories in Google and Google Scholar through the application of page count and visibility indicators. For a sample of 137 repositories, the results indicate that the indexing ratio is low in Google, and virtually nonexistent in Google Scholar; they also indicate a complete lack of correspondence between the repository records and the data produced by these two search tools. These results are mainly attributable to limitations arising from the use of description schemas that are incompatible with Google Scholar (repository design) and the reliability of web indicators (search engines). We conclude that neither Google nor Google Scholar accurately represent the actual size of open access content published by Latin American repositories; this may indicate a non-indexed, hidden side to open access, which could be limiting the dissemination and consumption of open access scholarly literature.

Lire la suite : http://arxiv-web3.library.cornell.edu/abs/1406.4331