Adapting the EU Copyright Rules to the Digital Transformation

European Parliamentary Research Service (15/07/2014). Adapting the EU Copyright Rules to the Digital Transformation. http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/note/join/2014/536333/IPOL-IMPT_NT(2014)536333_EN.pdf

The initiative to modernise the EU copyright framework was launched in May 2011 in the European Commission’s strategy on « A Single Market for Intellectual Property Rights » and pursuant to actions in the Commission’s Digital Agenda for Europe. In December 2012, the Commission then published a “Communication on Content in the Digital Single Market” in which it aims to complete the review in 2014, followed by legislative reform proposals, as appropriate. Although two new Directives in specific areas of copyright – on orphan works (2012) and on the collective management of copyright (2014) – have since been adopted, a White Paper is now expected, and should be accompanied by an ‘Impact Assessment’, which will in fact be a presentation of detailed policy orientations and options in advance of decisions on specific Commission initiatives (legislative and non-legislative). According to the CWP 2014, its Annexes, and the 2013 Roadmap, the review seeks to achieve a modern framework that fosters innovative practices, creativity, cultural diversity, new business models, guarantees effective recognition and remuneration of rights holders, and enhances legal offers for end users while tackling piracy more effectively.

Lire la suite : http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/note/join/2014/536333/IPOL-IMPT_NT(2014)536333_EN.pdf

Impact of library discovery technologies : a report for UKSG

Impact of library discovery technologies : a report for UKSG / Valérie Spezi, Claire Creaser, Ann O’Brien, Angela Conyers. http://www.uksg.org/researchstudy

The goals of the study were:

  • To evaluate the impact that library discovery technologies (such as link resolvers and web-scale resource discovery services) have on the use of academic resources
  • To provide evidence to determine if there is a case for (a) investment in discovery technologies by libraries and (b) engagement with library discovery technologies by publishers and others in the academic information supply chain (unless no positive impact is found, in which case to provide evidence to this effect)
  • To provide recommendations for actions that libraries, publishers and others in the academic information supply chain should take to engage with such technologies to best support the discovery of resources for teaching, learning and research
  • To identify additional research, data, discussion, initiatives or other activities required that will support the implementation of the findings of this study.

Lire la suite : http://www.uksg.org/researchstudy

The acquisition of e-books in the libraries of the Swedish higher education institutions

Maceviciute, E., Borg, M., Kuzminiene R., Konrad, K. (2014). The acquisition of e-books in the libraries of the Swedish higher education institutions. Information Research, 19(2) paper 620. http://InformationR.net/ir/19-2/paper620.html

Introduction. Our aim is to compare the advantages and problems of e-book acquisition identified in research literature to those experienced by two Swedish university libraries.
Method. A literature review was used to identify the main issues related to acquisition of e-books by academic libraries. The data for comparison were collected through case studies in two Swedish universities. Document analysis, interviews and personal experience were used for data collection.
Results. The main drivers of e-book acquisition by Swedish academic libraries are the perceived needs of the users. E-books are regarded as potentially useful for solving some of the problems of library service. A number of challenges and problems identified by the participants in the case studies coincide with those that were derived from the literature review.
Conclusions. The problems of e-book acquisition in academic libraries seem to be common to the economically strong Western countries. University librarians see certain advantages of e-books for their users and libraries. Publishers and academic librarians expect that e-books would not lose the advantages that printed books offered to them. Hence, publishers restrict the usage of e-books to ensure revenues as if from selling individual copies. Librarians try to regain the same level of control over e-book collections as for printed materials.

Lire la suite : http://InformationR.net/ir/19-2/paper620.html

What Do Researchers Need ? Feedback On Use of Online Primary Source Materials

DeRidder Jody L. et Matheny Kathryn G., 2014, « What Do Researchers Need? Feedback On Use of Online Primary Source Materials », D-Lib Magazine, juillet 2014, vol. 20, no 7/8. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july14/deridder/07deridder.html

Cultural heritage institutions are increasingly providing online access to primary source materials for researchers. While the intent is to enable round-the-clock access from any location, few studies have examined the extent to which current web delivery is meeting the needs of users. Careful use of limited resources requires intelligent assessment of researcher needs in comparison to the actual online presentation, including access, retrieval and usage options. In the hopes of impacting future delivery methods and access development, this article describes the results of a qualitative study of 11 humanities faculty researchers at the University of Alabama, who describe and rate the importance of various issues encountered when using 29 participant-selected online databases.

Lire la suite : http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july14/deridder/07deridder.html