Are elite journals declining ?

Article déposé le 24 avril 2013 sur l’archive ouverte Arxiv.org :

Lariviere, Vincent, George A. Lozano, et Yves Gingras. « Are elite journals declining? » arXiv:1304.6460 (23 avril 2013). http://arxiv.org/abs/1304.6460

Previous work indicates that over the past 20 years, the highest quality work have been published in an increasingly diverse and larger group of journals. In this paper we examine whether this diversification has also affected the handful of elite journals that are traditionally considered to be the best. We examine citation patterns over the past 40 years of 7 long-standing traditionally elite journals and 6 journals that have been increasing in importance over the past 20 years. To be among the top 5% or 1% cited papers, papers now need about twice as many citations as they did 40 years ago. Since the late 1980s and early 1990s elite journals have been publishing a decreasing proportion of these top cited papers. This also applies to the two journals that are typically considered as the top venues and often used as bibliometric indicators of « excellence », Science and Nature. On the other hand, several new and established journals are publishing an increasing proportion of most cited papers. These changes bring new challenges and opportunities for all parties. Journals can enact policies to increase or maintain their relative position in the journal hierarchy. Researchers now have the option to publish in more diverse venues knowing that their work can still reach the same audiences. Finally, evaluators and administrators need to know that although there will always be a certain prestige associated with publishing in « elite » journals, journal hierarchies are in constant flux so inclusion of journals into this group is not permanent.

Lire la suite : http://arxiv.org/abs/1304.6460

A longitudinal comparison of citation rates and growth among open access journals

Bo-Christer Björk, Mikael Laakso, David Solomon and others (2013). A longitudinal comparison of citation rates and growth among open access journals. Publié sur le site Research on open access publishing le 23 avril 2013. Lire la suite : http://www.openaccesspublishing.org/2013/04/27/34/

Article accepté pour publication dans Journals of Infometrics http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S175115771300028

The study documents the growth in the number of journals and articles along with the increase in normalized citation rates of open access (OA) journals listed in the Scopus bibliographic database between 1999 and 2010. Longitudinal statistics on growth in journals/articles and citation rates are broken down by funding model, discipline, and whether the journal was launched or had converted to OA. The data were retrieved from the web sites of SCIMago Journal and Country Rank (journal /article counts), JournalM3trics (SNIP2 values), Scopus (journal discipline) and Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) (OA and funding status). OA journals/articles have grown much faster than subscription journals but still make up less that 12% of the journals in Scopus. Two-year citation averages for journals funded by article processing charges (APCs) have reached the same level as subscription journals. Citation averages of OA journals funded by other means continue to lag well behind OA journals funded by APCs and subscription journals. We hypothesize this is less an issue of quality than due to the fact that such journals are commonly published in languages other than English and tend to be located outside the four major publishing countries.

Lire la suite : http://www.openaccesspublishing.org/2013/04/27/34/